New Nike McIIroy Woods Ad

Apparently young Rory is getting paid between $100 million and $125 million to be a Nike brand ambassador over the next five years. He could buy a fair few alarm clocks with that bounty. Maybe it's me, but this slapstick and knockabout new ad featuring him and Tiger goofing around on the golf course feels so tonally off the mark for both brand and the level of investment in what Cindy Davis, President of Nike Golf calls the "epitome of a Nike athlete".

 Caddyshack, it ain't. Talking of which...

6 comments:

  1. Agreed. However, they only mark anyone needs to hit anymore is 'memorable'. And because our memories have shrunk to that of a fruit fly the mark is huge. Nobody even knows what any given brand's identity is anymore - they don't need to.

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  2. You put golf on your blog.

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  3. Interesting thoughts, but I can't agree I'm afraid Kevin. All advertising should aim to be 'memorable', but on it's own that is nowhere near enough. The aim must be to move the punter closer to buying the product (how best to do this is different for every product, brand or category). There are plenty of things that are memorable but don't do anything for the product or brand that they're advertising.

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  4. Jim, I know. End of days stuff.

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  5. I don't think that 'memorable' is enough either. However, that's the direction the awards/recognition/trend-based work seems to be headed. Mine is an outsiders perspective, so I'll defer, but from a "punter's" point of view the product is often indistinguishable...

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  6. Kevin no need to defer, all opinions are welcome, especially "punters". Your point "from a punter's point of view the product is often indistinguishable" is quite right, that's part of the problem.

    And what you say about "that's the direction the awards/recognition/trend-based work seems to be headed" is very true, but this approach and feedback loop of self-interest is something that we revile here, as it has nothing to do with what is actually good or works out there in the real world.

    The ad business, and in particular, creatives, are in danger of disappearing up their own arseholes.

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