The Makers Mark

Once upon a time, in an Agency far far away - a brief landed in an inbox. This brief was the most beautiful brief any at the Agency had ever seen, it glistened like the nape of a female tennis players' neck (mid set, a proper grunt ladened one), and all that regarded it swooned. After a number of weeks exploring its cavernous regions - a multitude of ideas were presented, each like a baby Lion proudly held aloft for all to celebrate.

After much applause and backslapping - and presentation of ballpark production costs associated with each - it was said with a heavy heart that the Client did not have the necessary budget to realise any of the ideas.

This is a story of enchantment, hope and heartbreak.

On Linkedin I've seen a few Producers post moan-y 'aren't-clients-stupid' things like the below:



These posts might raise a smile amongst those able to stop licking their elbows long enough to look at their computers ; however what does this really say about a Producer?

It's very easy to make amazing work if you have lots of cash - and doesn't take a genius to do it. Things can be done faster, and to a better quality if you throw money at it - human nature takes care of that one for us. With all the money in the world - all that is required is the ability to google 'best Photographer/Director', a talky box to repeat what some creative-type spouted along with any relevant adjectives, and a functioning hand to keep writing the necessary cheques.

A good Producer is able to realise an ambitious concept using sod all budget. They can find savings beyond the sum of a jobs parts, find efficiencies, and are able to deal with random last minute curve ball requests that change everything. It's someone who doesn't read off a rate card - but who's responsive and can anticipate and embrace change.

It's always nice to go into a job knowing if shit happens, you've got some cash in your pocket to help rescue things - but in my opinion a successfully run Production should do the idea justice, come in on time, and be under budget.

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